The finished rosette and cutting the sound hole

In my previous post I talked about the zen of scraping. After hours of meditative fun, I managed to get the rosette flush with the top wood. The next step was to cut the sound hole. I did this using a circle cutter, turning it by hand. I took care to cut along the grain, as simply turning the cutter in one direction around the sound hole would lead to tear out. Since the cutter had to cut right through the soundboard, I cut away some of the wood on the waste side of the sound hole with a knife. This created room for the non-cutting side of the blade to move through the wood. When I was almost through, I flipped the soundboard over and cut the last bit from the other side. Here’s what it looked like just before I got through the wood:

Cutting the sound hole

Cutting the sound hole

And here are some pictures of the resulting sound hole, with of course, the rosette all nice and smooth:

The sound hole, the rosette and the off-cut

The sound hole, the rosette and the off-cut

The finished rosette

The finished rosette

The simple act of cutting the sound hole (it only took about twenty minutes) feels like a major milestone in transforming the top from ‘a nice thin plank of wood’ to proper guitar soundboard. It’s starting to look like a guitar!

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One thought on “The finished rosette and cutting the sound hole

  1. Pingback: A rosewood back with an olive wood strip | Guitar building by hand

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